Class Descriptions

Tuesday, June 4

Project Design
Instructors: Jesse Henderson and Nicole Finzer
10:15 – 12:15

Learning Outcomes:

  • Learn the concrete step-by-step process (budgeting/funding, delegating, estimating project length, assessment, etc.) for designing a digital project
  • Practical introduction to managing digital projects, including project management tools

Get your feet wet in this practical introduction to digital project design. Some of the topics we will cover include funding, scoping, staffing, delegating, workflow creation, assessing risk, etc. Learn the step-by-step processes, review project management tools, and discover how to identify deliverables for a digital project.

Project Design Practicum
Instructors: 
Jesse Henderson and Nicole Finzer
1:15 – 2:00

Learning Outcomes:

  • Participants will work on a step-by-step project checklist that identifies their next steps in the process
  • Toolbox of project design/management takeaways

Project management is about people! What does it take to be an effective project manager? To create an effective project design, it is imperative to include multiple stakeholders during the planning phase, and clearly assign roles and responsibilities to team members. You will work in groups on case studies that result in diving into drafting a matrix that identifies the steps in the process and result in a toolbox of takeaways.

Intellectual Property
Instructor: Nancy Sims
2:15 – 3:15 and 3:30 – 4:30

Learning Outcomes:

  • Understand copyright, fair use, and licensing in regard to the educational use of images
  • Learn the basics of fair use in educational and cultural heritage contexts
  • Develop a vocabulary of intellectual property terminology for professional use

Understanding copyright, fair use, and licensing in regard to the educational use of visual materials is essential to successfully managing digital projects. This session will cover Fair Use, case law that may impact the use of images for education, specific digital and web issues, and introduce a vocabulary for professional use. Dive deeper into copyright issues specific to the cultural heritage and visual resource fields by looking at rights and reproductions guidelines, established standards, and emerging best practices.

Intellectual Property Practicum
Instructor: Nancy Sims
4:45 – 5:30

Learning Outcomes:

  • Review and discuss real-life case studies and dilemmas on the use of images for education and specific digital and web issues
  • Participants will ask questions to discuss with the instructor and the group

Real-world examples of copyright and intellectual property rights challenges will be examined to engage participants in active learning. Through discussions of real-life dilemmas, students will learn how to approach and solve problems as they interact with their peers through debate, presentations, and ad hoc role plays. The instructor will provide case studies for discussion. Participants are also asked to provide questions in advance to discuss with the group and the expert


Wednesday, June 5

Digitization
Instructor: 
Jesse Henderson
9:00 – 11:00

Learning Outcomes:

  • Learn digitization capture standards, process control, hardware and software, and FADGI
  • Evaluate digitization quality
  • Determine workflow, labor, and cost for digitization projects
  • Establish a vocabulary of digitization terminology

Get your feet wet in this practical introduction to digitization. We’ll cover some basics on lingo related to digitization, organization of digital files, and capture standards. We’ll also cover how to think about equipment you’ll need, what considerations you should take in for your environment, and then jump in to thinking about workflows while also covering quality control. Lastly, you’ll come away with an understanding of the term ‘process monitoring’.

Digitization Practicum
Instructor: 
Jesse Henderson
11:15 – 12:30

Learning Outcomes:

  • Review and discuss real-world case studies on digitization standards and practical workflow implementations

The practicum time will cover more in depth process monitoring and how you might implement it into your digitization in even a small-scale way. This involves using targets in your digitization process at some point and using objective aim points to make adjustments to your scans.

Digital Preservation
Instructor: 
Nicole Finzer
1:30 – 2:30 and 2:45 – 3:45

Learning Outcomes:

  • Learn fundamental digital preservation concepts and practices, including the vulnerabilities of digital files and potential threats
  • Review methods and procedures to manage and preserve digital files

How do you ensure continued access to digital content over time? This session provides an introduction to fundamentals of digital preservation policies, strategies and actions. You will learn from the perspective of a Digital Curation Librarian, whose work encompasses the selection, acquisition, preservation, maintenance, and delivery of digital content. You will review methods and procedures to manage and preserve digital content, and get your feet wet applying them to case studies via group work.

Digital Preservation Practicum
Instructor: 
Nicole Finzer
4:00 – 4:45

Learning Outcomes:

  • Introduce software tools for digital preservation
  • Gain experience processing files and preparing them for preservation via demonstrations and hands-on exercises

What software tools do you use for digital preservation? You will get your feet wet exploring software and processing files to prepare them for preservation via demonstrations and hands-on exercises. This module will provide a foundation for DAMs and Digital Repositories, which will cover proprietary and open source systems that include preservation actions (e.g. Samvera/Hyku, Preservica, and Archivemetica).


Thursday, June 6

Metadata for Cultural Heritage Materials: Getting Your Feet Wet
Instructor: 
Greta Bahnemann
9:00 – 10:30

Learning Outcomes:

  • Learn how to create and manage technical, descriptive, and administrative metadata
  • Select appropriate schema and crosswalks
  • Cleanup existing metadata

Jump in! The metadata water is fine. In this module, Greta will address the myriad issues associated with creating metadata for digitized content. This module will provide an overview of the variety of original, analog materials and their associated digital forms. She will then delve into creating and managing technical, descriptive, and administrative metadata, the selection of an appropriate metadata schema, understanding crosswalks, writing metadata guidelines, and metadata cleanup work.

Embedded Metadata: Swimming Out a Little Further
Instructor: Greta Bahnemann

10:45 – 12:00

Learning Outcomes:

  • Introduce embedding metadata into digital image files, the tools for reading and writing it, and how to use it for data acquisition, workflow management, and the exchange of information through the delivery of image assets with embedded content

Swim out a little further – and explore the foundational principles of embedded metadata. Today’s metadata discussion continues with an introduction to embedding metadata into digital image files, the tools used for reading and writing embedded metadata, and how metadata can be used effectively in digital workflows and to support the exchange of information through the delivery of image assets with embedded content.

Metadata Practicum: Breaking the Ice on Practical Projects
Instructor: 
Greta Bahnemann
1:00 – 2:00

Learning Outcomes:

  • Gain experience with metadata by reviewing examples and applying the principles of metadata standards such VRACore and Dublin Core to real-world image case studies

This session will provide an overview of recent metadata-related projects that Greta has implemented at the Minnesota Digital Library. She will discuss her work with applying geospatial metadata, creating Primary Source Sets, conducting a digital collection gap analysis, and discuss the Minnesota Digital Library’s ongoing work to implement standardized rights statements. These case studies will provide students with some practical examples of digital collection work and demonstrate how digital collections are evolving and changing resources.

DAMs and Digital Repositories: What is a repository and why do I need one?
Instructor: Julie Rudder

2:15 – 3:15 and 3:30 – 4:30

Learning Outcomes:

  • Define and describe digital asset management vs. digital repository vs. digital curation vs. digital stewardship
  • Explore popular proprietary and open source digital assets access, management, and preservation systems (e.g. CONTENTdm, Samvera/Hyku, Bepress, JStor Forum (formerly SharedShelf), Omeka, Preservica, and Archivematica)
  • Introduce the Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF); including some demonstrations of sites of repositories using it

This session will help to demystify concepts related to digital repositories and content stewardship such as digital asset management, DAMS, digital curation, data curation, digital preservation, and more. We’ll consider how and why service, infrastructure, and content management are the foundation of repository management. We’ll also talk about the types of staffing and support that repositories need.

DAMs and Digital Repositories Practicum: What kind of repository do I need and what services will we offer?
Instructor: 
Julie Rudder
4:45 – 5:30

Learning Outcomes:

  • Learn practical considerations for choosing or creating a system based on your own project

In this session we will work from personal or supplied use cases and scenarios in order to design a repository service and implementation approach. We will cover popular proprietary and open source systems and consider the pros and cons of different systems (e.g. ContentDM, Samvera/Hyku, Bepress, SharedShelf, Omeka, Preservica, and Archivematica). We will also introduce the Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF) and its use in current repositories.


Friday, June 7

Instructional Design and User Outreach
Instructor: Courtney Baron

9:00 – 11:00

Learning Outcomes:

  • Identify your end users or potential stakeholders
  • Determine the best methods for promoting your content and engaging with users via social media and other venues
  • Learn how to aggregate your collections to DPLA
  • Design learning activities (such as assignments or instructional workshops) around your digital collections based on your institution’s curriculum/mission and faculty research/user interests

Close the loop on the digital life cycle by strategizing ways to help your end users navigate the shores of your digital collections. Develop methods for promoting your content and engaging with users through social media and other outreach initiatives. Design learning activities, such as assignments or instructional workshops, around your digital collections based on your institution’s mission and user interests. Participants will leave SEI with the end in mind to successfully complete their digital projects.

Brainstorming “Camp”
Instructors TBA

11:15 – 12:30

This will be your opportunity to bring questions, flesh out other areas of interest, or take a deeper dive into subjects already covered. You’ll have the SEI co-chairs as well as your fellow attendees to brainstorm with and augment your learning experiences from the week.